slay or kill in ISR?

Probably a dumb question - but can “slay” or “kill” be used in an ISR?

Jessica

Jessica Edwards <jessicae@logicpd.com> wrote in message
news:bfk55g$od3$1@inn.qnx.com

Probably a dumb question - but can “slay” or “kill” be used in an ISR?

No.

What you can do is Trigger() a proxy belonging to another process to do the
kill() at process time. I’m sure others will have different ideas on how to
skin this cat differently.

-Adam

Adam Mallory <amallory@qnx.com> wrote:

Jessica Edwards <> jessicae@logicpd.com> > wrote in message
news:bfk55g$od3$> 1@inn.qnx.com> …
Probably a dumb question - but can “slay” or “kill” be used in an ISR?

What you can do is Trigger() a proxy belonging to another process to do the
kill() at process time. I’m sure others will have different ideas on how to
skin this cat differently.

Just to make sure everything is absolutely clear, what Adam meant is
that your ISR can return the pid of a proxy, and then the kernel will
Trigger() it for you. He didn’t mean to say that you can just call the
Trigger() function from the ISR.

Did I get this right, Adam? :slight_smile:

Wojtek Lerch <wojtek_l@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
news:bfm7pa$aob$1@inn.qnx.com

Just to make sure everything is absolutely clear, what Adam meant is
that your ISR can return the pid of a proxy, and then the kernel will
Trigger() it for you. He didn’t mean to say that you can just call the
Trigger() function from the ISR.

Did I get this right, Adam? > :slight_smile:

Sorry, yes you’re right - serves me right for reading the interrupt handling
code too much :slight_smile:

-Adam