Good show

I’m very pleased to see QNX finally come out in a freebee version. I played
with it back in 1985, and it was the only OS around that could squeeze real
multi-user performance out of an IBM PC-XT clone. There was never a chance
to use it at work, as we were using physically large, proprietary real time
systems, and the custom hardware would not have fit in a PC chasis. Also,
there were reliability questions over using PCs for our critical
applications back then. But I thought it was great that there was an OS
which could get a lot of processor power out to the user in a multi-tasking
environment on an early x-86 box. Also, the idea of having a kernel which
was involved only with process scheduling and message passing, and didn’t
involve itself in I/O, protocols, and filesystems seemed an elegant
invention. This is not to mention the transparent resource sharing within a
QNX network, which no OS existing even today has managed to fully duplicate.

For many years, QNX has seemed to be one of the best kept secrets in the OS
business. I doubt it will stay that way for too much longer.

Before closing, I do have a few questions:

  1. Can the RTP be run without the GUI, giving a plain full screen shell?

  2. How does the efficiency of the present, Neutrino based RTP compare with
    the old (circa 1985) QNX? That old release seemed incredibly efficient.

  3. Could you release a freebee RTP version that will allow some QNX style
    networking? I think that having the transparent resource sharing features
    available for free might give some of the Linux generation folks some ideas
    for new distributed applications.

Best of luck to everyone at QSSL on the RTP endeavor.

Paul Missman

“Paul Missman” <missmanp@adephia.net> wrote in message
news:8r61bl$hrc$1@inn.qnx.com

snip

Before closing, I do have a few questions:

  1. Can the RTP be run without the GUI, giving a plain full screen shell?

Absolutely…Photon GUI is totally optional.

  1. How does the efficiency of the present, Neutrino based RTP compare
    with
    the old (circa 1985) QNX? That old release seemed incredibly efficient.

From numbers I have read/heard, significantly better realtime performance,
plus they have finally added swapfile support for non-realtime apps. I am
told it is actually easier to embed. (Hard to believe it can be easier than
QNX2 or QNX4).

  1. Could you release a freebee RTP version that will allow some QNX style
    networking? I think that having the transparent resource sharing features
    available for free might give some of the Linux generation folks some
    ideas
    for new distributed applications.

It’s in the current release :slight_smile:
QNX native networking is now called Qnet
(http://www.qnx.com/products/networking/qnet.html)

Best of luck to everyone at QSSL on the RTP endeavor.

Paul Missman

Paul Missman <missmanp@adephia.net> wrote:

Before closing, I do have a few questions:

  1. Can the RTP be run without the GUI, giving a plain full screen shell?

Yes. Starting Photon is optional.

  1. How does the efficiency of the present, Neutrino based RTP compare with
    the old (circa 1985) QNX? That old release seemed incredibly efficient.

The same.

  1. Could you release a freebee RTP version that will allow some QNX style
    networking? I think that having the transparent resource sharing features
    available for free might give some of the Linux generation folks some ideas
    for new distributed applications.

The version you have already does this, you just need to turn it on. :slight_smile:

mount -Tio-net /x86/lib/dll/npm-qnet.so

Then you will get a /net with all the Neutrino machines on your local
net listed. You can then do things like…

qtalk -m /net/otherguy/dev/ser1

Just like qnx4. Right now “on -n” is not implimented though.

chris

\

cdm@qnx.com > “The faster I go, the behinder I get.”

Chris McKillop – Lewis Carroll –
Software Engineer, QSSL
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Thanks for the info Chris. Can you point out some online doc pages where I
can find more info on how to set this up (What is the equivalent of QNX4
netmap etc, or is it the same?)
Thanks
Markus



The version you have already does this, you just need to turn it on. > :slight_smile:

mount -Tio-net /x86/lib/dll/npm-qnet.so

Then you will get a /net with all the Neutrino machines on your local
net listed. You can then do things like…

qtalk -m /net/otherguy/dev/ser1

Just like qnx4. Right now “on -n” is not implimented though.

chris

\

cdm@qnx.com > “The faster I go, the behinder I get.”
Chris McKillop – Lewis Carroll –
Software Engineer, QSSL

Chris McKillop <cdm@qnx.com> wrote:
: Paul Missman <missmanp@adephia.net> wrote:
:>
:> Before closing, I do have a few questions:
:>
:> 1. Can the RTP be run without the GUI, giving a plain full screen shell?
:>

: Yes. Starting Photon is optional.

Just touch the file /etc/system/config/nophoton and the RTP
will no longer boot into Photon.

:>
:> 2. How does the efficiency of the present, Neutrino based RTP compare with
:> the old (circa 1985) QNX? That old release seemed incredibly efficient.
:>

: The same.

:>
:> 3. Could you release a freebee RTP version that will allow some QNX style
:> networking? I think that having the transparent resource sharing features
:> available for free might give some of the Linux generation folks some ideas
:> for new distributed applications.
:>

: The version you have already does this, you just need to turn it on. :slight_smile:

: mount -Tio-net /x86/lib/dll/npm-qnet.so

: Then you will get a /net with all the Neutrino machines on your local
: net listed. You can then do things like…

: qtalk -m /net/otherguy/dev/ser1

: Just like qnx4. Right now “on -n” is not implimented though.

: chris


: –
:>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
: cdm@qnx.com “The faster I go, the behinder I get.”
: Chris McKillop – Lewis Carroll –
: Software Engineer, QSSL
: <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Markus Loffler <loffler@ces.clemson.edu> wrote:

Thanks for the info Chris. Can you point out some online doc pages where I
can find more info on how to set this up (What is the equivalent of QNX4
netmap etc, or is it the same?)

Nope, it is different, the docs are in the Helpviewer:
from the QNX Neutrino Utilities Reference

io-net → i/o network manager, supports dynamic loading of optional network
modules

npm-tcpip.so → TCP/IP stack network module, replaces Socket/Socklet
npm-qnet.so → Qnet sort of replaces Net
npm-* → see docs…
phlip → Photon Tcp/ip and dialup configuration tool
(links to other utilities are at bottom for each of these)


From the QNX Neutrino Technotes -->QNet(technote on QNX Neutrino native
networking)

Chris

Thanks
Markus



The version you have already does this, you just need to turn it on. > :slight_smile:

mount -Tio-net /x86/lib/dll/npm-qnet.so

Then you will get a /net with all the Neutrino machines on your local
net listed. You can then do things like…

qtalk -m /net/otherguy/dev/ser1

Just like qnx4. Right now “on -n” is not implimented though.

chris

\

cdm@qnx.com > “The faster I go, the behinder I get.”
Chris McKillop – Lewis Carroll –
Software Engineer, QSSL

Markus Loffler <loffler@ces.clemson.edu> wrote:

Thanks for the info Chris. Can you point out some online doc pages where I
can find more info on how to set this up (What is the equivalent of QNX4
netmap etc, or is it the same?)

There is no netmap anymore!!! YEAH! It uses IP to do routing and
such now, not just raw mac addresses. So everying gets used via a
machine’s hostname, not node number.

chris

\

cdm@qnx.com > “The faster I go, the behinder I get.”

Chris McKillop – Lewis Carroll –
Software Engineer, QSSL
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Thanks for the info Chris. Can you point out some online doc pages where
I
can find more info on how to set this up (What is the equivalent of QNX4
netmap etc, or is it the same?)


There is no netmap anymore!!! YEAH! It uses IP to do routing and
such now, not just raw mac addresses. So everying gets used via a
machine’s hostname, not node number.

Chris could you be more specific ?

I try to setup the TCP/IP here and it doesn’t work at all,
we have a Sun OS, Unix, NT/4 network and it worked pretty fine on QNX4,
but with RtP it doesn’t work at all. I can’t ping any where on the network.

What should I do ??

Fred.

Fred <fprog@users.sourceforge.net> wrote:

I try to setup the TCP/IP here and it doesn’t work at all,
we have a Sun OS, Unix, NT/4 network and it worked pretty fine on QNX4,
but with RtP it doesn’t work at all. I can’t ping any where on the network.

What should I do ??

Is your network card even functional? :slight_smile: Can you give me brand and
model # of the ethernet card you are using if it isn’t? Look in /dev/io-net/
and you should see (at least) en0, ip0 and ip_en entries. Also, you
can run nicinfo and “cat /proc/ipstats” and see what is going on with
the card and the TCP/IP stack. Have you used phlip to configure your
interface?

chris

cdm@qnx.com > “The faster I go, the behinder I get.”

Chris McKillop – Lewis Carroll –
Software Engineer, QSSL
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Previously, Paul Missman wrote in qdn.public.qnxrtp.advocacy:

  1. Can the RTP be run without the GUI, giving a plain full screen shell?

Yes.

  1. How does the efficiency of the present, Neutrino based RTP compare with
    the old (circa 1985) QNX? That old release seemed incredibly efficient.

This is really an impossible question to answer, but here goes. The kernel
is probably not quite as efficient, but comparable. This is irrelevent since
processors are two orders of magnituded faster than in 1985. Many single
threaded features of QNX2, floppy+hard-disk access, are no longer so.

  1. Could you release a freebee RTP version that will allow some QNX style
    networking? I think that having the transparent resource sharing features
    available for free might give some of the Linux generation folks some ideas
    for new distributed applications.

RTP includes this.


Mitchell Schoenbrun --------- maschoen@pobox.com