QNX on the web

Hi

Is that possible/reasonable to use QNX6 as a web site core OS?
Is there any good software like Apache, PHP, Perl etc.?
Any mailers (POP3/IMAP4) available?

Do you know any sites running QNX ?

Does QSSL runs its site on QNX ?

Pete DiMarco wrote:

generalization

General purpose OSes are designed to squeeze as much
throughput out of a CPU as possible. They can use heuristic
scheduling algorithms to juggle processes in a manner that
helps keep the CPU busy. A little starvation here and there is
acceptible if the overall number of transactions processed
is high. On the other hand, hard RTOSes sacrifice CPU cycles
to guarantee minimal latency for high priority processes.

/generalization

I hope I haven’t stepped on anybody’s toes… this post isn’t
meant to be a troll. If I’m in error, I look forward to reading
your corrections.

Sounds like a reasonable generalization to me. Use the tool
for what it’s designed for (or does well). I don’t suggest
that people do HRT with Linux, I don’t suggest people run
business applications on QNX.

Rennie

Dmitri Ivanov <ivdal@yahoo.com> wrote:

Do you know any sites running QNX ?

QNX Zone (http://www.qnxzone.com) runs 100% on QNX.

We are currently running QNX 6.2 NC, PostgreSQL, Apache,
PHP, MySQL, and vBulletin software.

Cheers,
Camz.

Previously, Dmitri Ivanov wrote in comp.os.qnx:

Hi

Is that possible/reasonable to use QNX6 as a web site core OS?
Is there any good software like Apache, PHP, Perl etc.?
Any mailers (POP3/IMAP4) available?

QNX is a great RTOS, and due to it being POSIX-compliant
there’s a lot of great software that will run on it. QNX also
has a fairly small foot-print, so it would make a good OS for
an embedded web server. However, web servers do not require
hard realtime performance (I doubt that anything that runs over
TCP/IP can be hard realtime). For an ordinary web server with
plenty of computing resources it might be more reasonable for
you to use *BSD or Linux because…

General purpose OSes are designed to squeeze as much
throughput out of a CPU as possible. They can use heuristic
scheduling algorithms to juggle processes in a manner that
helps keep the CPU busy. A little starvation here and there is
acceptible if the overall number of transactions processed
is high. On the other hand, hard RTOSes sacrifice CPU cycles
to guarantee minimal latency for high priority processes.

I hope I haven’t stepped on anybody’s toes… this post isn’t
meant to be a troll. If I’m in error, I look forward to reading
your corrections.

  • PDM


    PS- This posting was written on a system running QNX4.



    Pete DiMarco | Email: peted AT ifspurity DOT com
    Staff Software Engineer | Web: www.ifspurity.com
    Integrated Flow Systems | AIM: gregthebunny42
    250 Technology Circle | Tel: 831-440-1700 x139
    Scotts Valley, CA 95066 | FAX: 831-440-9700